Showing 1 review for Sony XNV-770BT

Customer Review Summary for Sony XNV-770BT
Average Customer Rating is 3.6 out of 5 stars:
3.6
based on 20 Reviews
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Rating Distribution:
5 star:
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35%
4 star:
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20%
3 star:
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30%
2 star:
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0%
1 star:
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15%
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Average Attributes Rating:
Durability
3.5
Value
3.8
Features
3.6
Design
4.0
Usability
3.2
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September 11, 2011 Follow up review from Tyler
Review by
Tyler from Round Rock, TX
Overall
Durability
Value
Features
Design
Usability
OK...so I took the family on a 5200-mile road trip around the desert southwest for three weeks in July and I am ready really review the Sony Nav unit. Watch out, there's strong language that follows.

As we all enjoyed looking at home video taken by my son while I was driving through colorful Colorado, I was 'booping and beeping' (code for pressing endless buttons to work the tedious menus) and muttering on the video over the damned worthless navigation menu while trying to trick the navigation into finding that elusive "valid GPS signal" during a clear blue day at the top of the Rocky mountains". F&&&%%g piece of s*&t! hung me out to dry for three days before it "found" it's next signal..by which time I was already back to relying solely on the atlas. More reasons for using a physical map over this unit later.

The iPod-based music developed an incessant hiss during music play that about drove me to pull my hair out. Cycling through three different MP3 players confirmed that the issue was coming from the deck, not my iPhone, or the Zune, or that cheap Wal-mart Mp3 player.

Before I forget, I will point out two significant failures by the navigation. And yes, I understand that Tom-Tom disclaims any responsibility for both wrong directions and missed short-cuts. The trek to Carlsbad Caverns had 40 miles (one way - 80 freaking miles total) added to it since the Tom-Tom didn't recognize the highway that cut across rather than send us way north to the town of Carlsbad (the navigation was set to the National Park, BTW). The second and last failure before this POS blanked out for a week occurred in the remote village of Los Angeles, California, once again, during perfect weather and while acknowledging over a dozen satellites in the GPS menu. While seeking an evening at the Griffith Observatory, the navigation insisted that we turn into an incorrect neighborhood at dusk, not the giant city park, and even gave us specific verbal directions through scores of switchbacks to get as high up the ridge as possible before we reached the dead end next to someone's house. I don't mean to go on, but you've heard of this place, right...Griffith Observatory, like in about 50 movies? Well, "Jane" the British chick's voice that directed us through this bourgeois neighborhood, became something of a joke for all of us before I just shut her off for good. I still find humor in letting her direct me home from my office 8 miles from home when she decides to find a signal...which is two or three times a week. She still wants me to go 5 miles out of the way to the Interstate even when I am within a mile of home. Last month she worked every day for two week straight!!!...not enough to rebuild the trust lost out on the open road when she was needed. Oh, gosh, that totally reminds me, "Jane" took a three day vacation while we were in Denver...so we weren't actually led astray, just forgotten. During an intense thunderstorm, I couldn't locate a shadow to find east to get to Aurora and Jane sure as hell wasn't around to help. I did what every new owner of this unit would do in this situation. I pulled over and asked for directions and bought a city map. F*%k you, Jane!

So, I guess it's fair to say, I'm unhappy with this unit. The DVD is great and the radio works, but so what? I dropped over a grand between this deck and installation to avoid the issues that were actually compounded by having this pile of junk clogging up my dashboard. We actually laugh about it now, since the impact was negligible and we used our other resources to navigate around the Tom-Tom (pretty funny, huh?). But really, what the hell is the point if I can see 14-16 satellites on the configuration screen, but the GD Tom-Tom can't seem to triangulate a signal. And I really got pissed when, while driving, I looked over at the light to some college student on a 1980's Toyota looking at clear directions in his 2" screen Tom-Tom windshield unit while my crazy-expensive unit was OOO. I honked my horn and asked him what he was using, just to be sure. I have been to several forums and have found that this was the biggest issue with these units in Europe BEFORE they were made available in the US. So, with full knowledge of this problem, Sony decided to drop these defective units on folks like me. I'm not sure is my warranty is still good, and I have no idea how I would replace the old CD player since the entire dashboard came off for the install.

I'm feeling pretty boned and disappointed. But, I don't want to come across as a total whiner, but I have seen dozens factory of in-dash navigation units, and not one has these problems. I though I was making a keen decision to put one in my 8-year-old car. Talking about this unit makes me sad, so I'm going to stop now. It should have been really cool, you know?

Do not buy this hunk of garbage. Once the bugs get worked out, navigation signal loss, iPod navigation menu, whatever that hiss was, and the other breakage problems I have read about, it should be state of the art. Until then, stay away! I wonder if the Alpine is reliable? Thoughts? comments?
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